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Course Listings and Descriptions
Algebra: In Algebra I, students begin to study number properties more generally and become fluent at manipulating symbols with multiple step methods. All students should regularly be engaged in the Standards for Mathematical Practice as defined by the Common Core. Mathematical content should be addressed through the study of big ideas allowing students to see the connections between multiple concepts. The mathematical content of Algebra I includes Properties of Rational and Irrational Numbers, Creating and Interpreting Expressions and Equations, Linear Equations and Inequalities, including Linear Systems, Solving
Quadratic Equations using Multiple Methods, Interpreting and Building Functions using Proper Function Notation, and Summarizing, Representing, and Interpreting Data.

Algebra II: In Algebra II, students will extend their knowledge of functions to create and apply mathematical models to represent and interpret real-world contexts. The development and comparison of multiple solution methods and mathematical representations builds a level of fluency and conceptual understanding essential for the study of more advanced mathematics. All students should regularly be engaged in the Standards for Mathematical Practice as defined by the Common Core. Mathematical content should be addressed through the study of big ideas allowing students to see the connections between multiple concepts. The mathematical content of Algebra II includes Non-linear Relationships and Functions, Solving Complex Equations using Multiple Methods, Interpreting, Building,
and Modeling with Functions, Making Inferences and Conclusions from Data, and Probability

Art: This introductory visual arts course meets the high school graduation requirement. Students will plan and create both two and three-dimensional artwork using a variety of media, learn about different artists, engage in artistic criticism and aesthetic discussions, and investigate career opportunities in the arts. Participants will read and write in addition to creating and completing artworks. Each student is required to explore and document ideas within a sketchbook.

Art/Yearbook Design: This introductory level course will expose students to all aspects of school yearbook production. Participants will learn basic publishing skills including layout, photography, creative writing and editing. The course will investigate elements of good design and journalism practices and offer students opportunities to solve problems, develop content, and meet project deadlines. Students will demonstrate knowledge of related terminology through class discussions and critique.

Biology: Biology is a standard introductory course into the scientific study of life and life processes that is designed for students who are developing their problem solving, and analytical skills. Students taking biology will regularly experience hands-on, inquiry based learning opportunities. Students will engage in the Science and Engineering practices as outlined in a framework for K - 12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards to learn about essential Big Ideas such as the structure, function,and information processing, matter and energy in organisms, inheritance and variation of traits, natural selection, and evolution.

Chemistry: Chemistry is a standard introductory course into the scientific study of the properties of matter and the changes that matter undergoes during reactions that is designed for students who are developing their problem solving and analytical skills. Students taking Chemistry will regularly experience hands-on, inquiry-based learning opportunities. Students will engage in the Science and Engineering practices as outlined in a framework for K - 12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards to learn about essential Big Ideas such as the structure and properties of matter and chemical reactions.

College Algebra: Emphasis on the notion of a function as a unifying concept. Families of functions and their characteristics include: polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, solving inequalities and systems of non-linear equations, and applications involving problem-solving skills. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Computer Science: This course will provide an introduction to all aspects of business. The impact and application of computer technology as it relates to business will also be introduced. Students will develop proficiency in technology related to the workplace, including all Microsoft Office Products and the Google Apps for Business. Emphasis will be placed on using the computer, along with workplace communication skills (thinking, listening, composing, revising, editing, and speaking), math and problem solving. Students will be introduced to a wide range of careers in business and technology. Representatives of the industry through guest speakers will reinforce career and pre-employment skills. In addition, students will complete individual and team projects that will be presented to peers.

Drama: This is an introductory level course where students learn to appreciate diverse aspects of the discipline of theater. Students are introduced to acting, voice, improvisation, and script analysis.The course helps students to conceptualize the theatrical experience through examination of theater history and texts, as well as the process and product of staging performances.

English I: In English I students will engage in grade level Common Core State Standards (CCSS) aligned reading and writing practices, through a wide range of literary and informational texts to bridge their learning from middle school to high school. Students will engage in practices to support their emerging mastery of the CCSS for Writing in their grade band, and express themselves in multiple writing formats including narratives, investigative reports, literary analyses, and research papers. Across all writing formats, students will write in the conventions of the CCSS writing modes. Students in English I will employ academic English in discussion that align to CCSS for Speaking & Listening.

English II: In English II, students will engage in grade level Common Core State Standards (CCSS) aligned reading and writing practices, through a wide range of literary and informational texts that will build upon English I. Students will engage in practices to support their mastery of the CCSS for Writing in their grade band, and express themselves in multiple writing formats including narratives, investigative reports, literary analyses, and research papers. Across all writing formats, students will write in the conventions of the CCSS writing modes. Students in English II will employ academic English in discussion that align to CCSS for Speaking & Listening.

English III: In English III, students will engage in grade level Common Core State Standards (CCSS) aligned reading and writing practices, through a wide range of literary and informational texts that will emphasize college and career preparation. Students will engage in practices to support their emerging mastery of the CCSS for Writing in their grade band, and express themselves in multiple writing formats including narratives, investigative reports, literary analyses, and research papers. Across all writing formats, students will write in the conventions of the CCSS writing modes. Students in English III will employ academic English in discussion that align to CCSS for Speaking & Listening.

English IV: In English IV, students will engage in grade level Common Core State Standards (CCSS) aligned reading and writing practices, through a wide range of literary and informational texts that will prepare them for post-secondary experiences. Students will engage in practices to support their mastery of the CCSS for Writing in their grade band, and express themselves in multiple writing formats including narratives, investigative reports, literary analyses, and research papers. Across all writing formats, students will write in the conventions of the CCSS writing modes. Students in English IV will employ academic English in discussion that align to CCSS for Speaking & Listening.

Environmental Science: Environmental Science is a standard introductory course into the scientific study of the mutual relationships between organisms and their environment that is designed for students who are developing their problem-solving and analytic skills. Students taking Environmental Science will regularly experience hands-on, inquiry-based learning opportunities. Students will engage in the Science and Engineering Practices as outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards to learn about essential Big Ideas such as interrelations between organisms and the environment,
cycles of matter and energy transfers in ecosystems, and natural resources.

Geometry: In Geometry, students will reason inductively to construct geometric patterns, discover geometric relationships and formulate conjectures. Students will reason deductively to construct logical arguments and proofs using appropriate terminology. All students should regularly be engaged in the Standards for Mathematical Practice as defined by the Common Core. Mathematical content should be addressed through the study of big ideas allowing students to see the connections between multiple concepts. The mathematical content of Geometry includes Similarity and Congruence, Transformational Geometry, Right Triangles, Geometric Constructions and Proofs, Measurement and Dimension, Modeling, Coordinate Geometry, and Circles.

Integrated Mathematics I: In Mathematics I, students begin to formalize their learning from the middle grades to make connections across mathematical concepts. Students study both algebraic and geometric patterns to discover relationships and justify their reasoning. All students should regularly be engaged
in the Standards for Mathematical Practice as defined by the Common Core. Mathematical content should be addressed through the study of big ideas allowing students to see the connections between multiple concepts. The mathematical content of Mathematics I includes Creating and Interpreting Expressions and Equations, Linear Equations and Inequalities, including Linear Systems, Interpreting and Building Functions using Proper Function Notation, Summarizing, Representing, and Interpreting Data, Congruence, Transformational Geometry, and Geometric Proofs.

Journalism/Mass Communications: Students examine the principles of various media including, but not limited to print journalism, photojournalism, broadcast journalism, internet blogging, basic audio and video production, public relations and media/press kits. Students create media using journalistic techniques and standards, study the role of law and ethics in journalism, the responsibility of journalists to the public, the First Amendment to the Constitution, and analyze bias in various media outlets. Students will work on creating and writing a school newspaper or newsletter, maintain a school blog, and use audio-visual and editing software to create school, community, and student-centered video productions. Students will also analyze documentary film formats.

Photography: Through this beginning level course, students will explore both scientific and photographic art processes. The course will examine the historical, social and cultural aspects of photography as an art form and introduce varied styles and techniques. Basic darkroom methods and digital processes will also be covered along with the appropriate terminology for this medium. A general orientation about the principles of art will be used to critique student work.

Physical Education: Students will engage in a variety of physical activities designed to promote and develop lifelong health and skill related fitness. Experiences may include, but are not limited to: fitness based activities, fitness testing, health related concepts, individual and team activities, and wellness walking. Students will also engage in a classroom based health course that includes the following components of health; physical, spiritual, emotional, mental, environmental and social.

Spanish I: This course is designed to introduce non-native Spanish Speaking students to basic functional proficiency in Spanish with an emphasis on vocabulary development. Students will learn basic conversational topics, such as greetings and farewells, making descriptions of yourself and others, finding out information, talking about one’s family, ordering food, identifying personal belongings, identifying public buildings and places, making plans, making purchases, etc. The course enhances four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The emphasis is on student-student, and student-teacher interactions to simulate real world situations. Differentiation will be made for native speakers of Spanish.

Spanish II: This intermediate course is designed to introduce students to more advanced grammar structures in Spanish with an emphasis on sentence structure and verb tenses. It continues to enhance and further develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will be able to speak and write in the present tense, past tense, and future tense plus the use of high frequency irregular verbs. Students will be able to read passages, and write paragraphs and short essays. The course focuses on a communicative-based approach that emphasizes fluency. As a result, students will engage in oral skits that model common real-life situations. Differentiation will be made for native speakers of Spanish.

Speech: Public Speaking/Speech course is aimed at introducing students to the basic concepts of communication. It aims to make students not only better communicators, but better rhetoricians; people capable of using sound and ethical rhetoric and of analyzing other forms of communication for subtle usage of logos, ethos and pathos. Regardless of which career path you choose, you will have to interact with people. Learning to communicate well and speak with poise is among the most beneficial skills with which you can leave high school. In fact, to get a job you will have to go through an interview and, irrespective of how knowledgeable and well-qualified you are for the position, you must be able to convince the interviewer(s) that you are the best candidate. So, open your mind, clear your throat, and get ready to overcome your fears and become a better orator.

U.S. History: The study of United States History allows students to understand the people, ideas, and forces that have shaped this country. Moving through the development of our maturing democracy will allow students to explore both their individual and our collective place in an interdependent global society. Students will access diverse texts to explore what it means to live in America by studying the people, key ideas, and events that shaped our history and include a focus on the struggles to achieve class, ethnic, racial, and gender equality and the successes and failures that have shaped who we are.

World Studies: This course will focus student learning on the peoples, ideas, and forces that have shaped our world, and enable students to investigate their place in and capacity to act in an increasingly interdependent global society. It will allow students to appreciate the rich cultures that exist across the world. This course will advance through a combination of content knowledge, inquiry, and appropriate analytical skills in a literacy-rich fashion. These thematic investigations will include an emphasis on interdisciplinary social sciences and build understanding of cultural, institutional, economic, and technological patterns that, along with geography, have set the human stage.

Written and Oral Communication: The students learn and enhance their written and oral communication skills by presenting their views and opinions
to the class. Students learn how to arrange and present debates, speeches, and interviews to be effective leaders in today’s society.